[Infographic] Librarian Twitter Chats

librarian hashtags infographicTwitter is a great tool for educators to stay up-to-date on educational trends and communicate with others from around the world. Are you interested in getting started with Twitter? Or do you want to expand your existing online professional learning network? We have a new infographic to help you discover and connect with new educators and hashtag chats!

There are hundreds of educational Twitter chats happening weekly, but how do you keep track of all of them? In honor of the new school year, we published a handy infographic that lists when many librarian and educator hashtag chats are held.

See the infographic now!

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Librarians’ Perspectives on the Collaborative Teaching of Research Skills

This is the second of six blog posts, discussing what EasyBib learned from a second round of analysis of our information literacy surveys, which were administered earlier this year. For more information about how you can be the first to know about our findings, click here.

7K0A0597Librarians assume the role as an educator of critical thinking and research skills across all types of librarians, and is a fundamental responsibility of the profession. But how has this role changed in recent years? With the influx of technology and standards focused around collaboration, are librarians still the sole instructor, or do other faculty members have a greater influence on teaching these essential skills?

We’ve been taking a closer look at the numbers from our initial information literacy report, and this week we’re seeing how viewpoints on the librarian’s role as an instructor shifts across grade levels.

Our analysis broke respondents into six categories:

  • Elementary school
  • Middle school
  • High school
  • District-wide
  • Two-year college
  • Four-year college

After taking a closer look at the data, respondents across groups were pretty evenly split. Most of the groups felt that the librarian had the solely highest influence on teaching critical thinking and research skills. However, those who felt that faculty also have an important influence were only a few percentage points behind–sometimes as little as 5% (at two-year colleges), and on average, 9%.

Which groups had the most curious responses? How does this compare to our 2012 data? Read on to find out.

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Key Points to Communicate the Value of Information Literacy

Dani Brecher and Kevin Michael Klipfel

For many librarians, getting faculty on board with collaborative information literacy instruction can be a real challenge. Kevin Michael Klipfel and Dani Brecher are the librarians behind the Rule Number One Blog, and they presented on this topic as part of our Professional Development Series earlier this year.

Librarians take on many roles, but have you ever played the role as the existential hero, Q from James Bond, or the “cool” aunt or uncle? Well, these are all roles that can translate into what a librarian does, day in and day out.

We’ve reworked their session into a condensed interactive presentation, including voiceover and a video recording of the original webinar. Check it out, and let us know what you think!

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How Do K-12 & Academic Librarians View Student Understanding of Website Credibility?

This is the first of six blog posts, discussing what EasyBib learned from a second round of analysis of our information literacy surveys, which were administered earlier this year. For more information about how you can be the first to know about our findings, click here.

We’re ready to dive deeper into the next round of analysis of our information literacy survey of 10,000 students and 1,200 librarians. This week’s question?

How would you rate your students’ level of understanding

on properly evaluating a website for credibility?

 

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What did librarians and students tell us about research and critical thinking?

Both school and academic librarians agree–our students may not have the deepest understanding of how to evaluate a website. Do they know how to look for currency, relevancy, authority, accuracy, and purpose (or CRAAP, for those of you who use that method)?

K-12 Librarians

Elementary and middle school librarians say that over 60% of their students only have a rudimentary understanding–but that’s to be expected! Young students are just getting to know the web, and the earlier they learn, the better. We’ve got encouraging news from the high school librarians: they say 50% of their students have a rudimentary understanding (compared to that 60% at the elementary and middle school level), while 46% are at an average level, and 4% are advanced. K-12 district librarians are even more upbeat about website credibility comprehension, saying that almost 60% of their students have an average understanding.

What about academic librarians? How did this year’s data compare with our 2012 survey? Keep reading to find out!

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